Donnie Gladfelter

Donnie Gladfelter is a highly visible and respected thought leader in the CAD community. Named one of Autodesk's Top 35 Young Designers Under 35, he is well known for The CAD Geek Blog, six Autodesk Official Press books, and dozens of Autodesk University classes since 2007. An award-winning and top-rated speaker at Autodesk University and other industry events, Donnie has presented to audiences of 60,000+ people, and provided training to thousands on Autodesk design technology. As an Eagle Scout, he helps design teams be prepared for whatever their projects throw at them as the Design Technology Manager at Timmons Group (an ENR Top 500 Firm), and as an Autodesk Expert Elite Member.

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  • AutoCAD Grips Feature Image
    Learning
    If editing AutoCAD objects has you going crazy and feeling like you’re livin’ on the edge, it may be time to get a grip. Aerosmith references aside, grips are the foundation for countless editing tasks within AutoCAD. Because of this ubiquity when editing objects, it’s no surprise the more you can get a grip, the […]

  • Better CAD Manager Feature
    Learning
    The role of CAD manager is an interesting one. The title says we manage technology, but in my experience, that’s the easiest part of CAD management. The truth is, while our titles say we manage technology, the most significant part of our role isn’t technology. It’s people. We often frame our roles through the lens […]

  • Training Tips AutoCAD
    Learning
    You have a training program, but is it performing as well as you need it to? From retaining and hiring new employees to meet workload demands, pressures abound. If ever there was a time a more effective training program could benefit your teams, this is that time! Unfortunately, for many, a “more successful training program” […]

  • Corporate Training 2022
    Learning
    At Autodesk University 2017, I presented a class titled “Overcoming the Seven Deadly Sins of Corporate Training Programs” with Jason Kunkel. Despite truly being just five years ago, the workplace is a very different place today than it was then. From where we work to how we work and even when we work, many of […]

  • CAD Manager Favorite AutoCAD Features
    Learning
    Each new release of AutoCAD brings with it a bevy of new features. While, as an end-user myself, I undoubtedly geek out about these new features each year; what about features for CAD managers? As a CAD manager, my principal focus is simple. I want to find ways to help the teams I support to […]

  • AutoCAD upgrade
    Learning
    Historically, Autodesk releases a new version of AutoCAD each year and an update in between. Depending on your firm’s size, its number of offices, and other firm-specific factors, you’ll likely choose to plan your next upgrade around one of these events. Of course, in many ways, the decision to upgrade is the easy part. The […]

  • AutoCAD Process Assessment Step 4 Feature
    Learning
    Now, we’ve reached our last installment of a four-part series on conducting a process assessment of AutoCAD workflows and procedures. Finally, after bringing structure to a disorganized mountain of information as discussed in Step 3, the final step is to present and communicate what was found. While the meat of such an exercise is undoubtedly […]

  • AutoCAD Process Assessment Feature Step 3 Information
    Learning
    If you’re just joining us, this post is part three of a four-part series on conducting a process assessment of AutoCAD workflows and procedures. Recapping what we’ve discussed so far, part one of our series focused on the importance of planning. Specifically, how to identify and define the objectives of your assessment. After establishing our […]

  • AutoCAD Process Assessment Information Collection Feature
    Learning
    In part one of our series on conducting a process assessment for AutoCAD, we talked about the importance of beginning with a plan. Central to that plan was none other than defining your objectives. The goal in defining your objectives is to determine where you’re going to look—not what you’re looking for. When doing such […]